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Author Topic: Proper BCD lift capacity  (Read 1471 times)

sibingai

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Proper BCD lift capacity
« on: 16 Mar 17, 14:34 »
Hi there...can i have some advise on proper bcd lifting bladders
for proper trim??
Im a 110kg 1.8m guy who utilise 5 weights to dive.
Should/Can i use 18lbs,25 or 30lbs lift capabalities?
Single tank setup.

stupidawg

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Re: Proper BCD lift capacity
« Reply #1 on: 16 Mar 17, 15:17 »
I'm using 30lbs. I'm 175 and around 71 kg. Using only 1-2 weights. Wow, do you really need to use 5 weights?

sibingai

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Re: Proper BCD lift capacity
« Reply #2 on: 16 Mar 17, 17:55 »
I'm using 30lbs. I'm 175 and around 71 kg. Using only 1-2 weights. Wow, do you really need to use 5 weights?
Yes...too much "bouyant fats" in me...lolzzzz..
I cant decend with 4 weights even..unless i negative decend forcefully
Wow u using 30lbs?? For a 71kg?
« Last Edit: 16 Mar 17, 18:27 by sibingai »

stupidawg

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Re: Proper BCD lift capacity
« Reply #3 on: 17 Mar 17, 09:42 »
Yes, I also have another Wing for double tanks which is 44lbs.

snikrs

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Re: Proper BCD lift capacity
« Reply #4 on: 22 Mar 17, 13:04 »
Lift capacities for recreational diving are largely a comfort issue - higher lift equals a higher head position above the water on surface, which also equals wider wings, which require more movement underwater to shift the air precisely.

The minimal lift of a bladder of course should depend on what kind of tank you're diving, steel or aluminium. 18lbs, you'll definitely be struggling to keep afloat when using a 15L steel tank for example. Your lead weights also play a part towards sinking you on the surface, so don't forget to factor those in.

Generally I would say at least 25lbs if you're diving in wetsuits, 30+lbs if boardshorts + rashguard or for more flexibility. Extra lift is always better than keeping everything overly small and compact. That additional lift can come in handy, such as long waits on surface or choppy seas, or even when you need to perform a rescue.


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diver-hloc

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Re: Proper BCD lift capacity
« Reply #5 on: 22 Mar 17, 19:21 »
30lbs is usually enough... I was about 105kg using a backplate total 3kg in weight... currently in the low 90s kg and my DSLR system is mostly the weight... still using my trusty 30lbs float...
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sibingai

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Re: Proper BCD lift capacity
« Reply #6 on: 27 Mar 17, 21:33 »
Lift capacities for recreational diving are largely a comfort issue - higher lift equals a higher head position above the water on surface, which also equals wider wings, which require more movement underwater to shift the air precisely.

The minimal lift of a bladder of course should depend on what kind of tank you're diving, steel or aluminium. 18lbs, you'll definitely be struggling to keep afloat when using a 15L steel tank for example. Your lead weights also play a part towards sinking you on the surface, so don't forget to factor those in.

Generally I would say at least 25lbs if you're diving in wetsuits, 30+lbs if boardshorts + rashguard or for more flexibility. Extra lift is always better than keeping everything overly small and compact. That additional lift can come in handy, such as long waits on surface or choppy seas, or even when you need to perform a rescue.


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Aaahhh.... thanks for the detail explaination.

30lbs is usually enough... I was about 105kg using a backplate total 3kg in weight... currently in the low 90s kg and my DSLR system is mostly the weight... still using my trusty 30lbs float...
Thanks mate.. i was quite worried im using too big a lift.
Im using a DR Nomad which can be configured to a 40lbs to 55lbs lift.... but currently...its setup to ard 30lbs wing...


Thanks for the input shifus... :)