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Author Topic: Let's all contribute and do something to improve safety standards  (Read 6094 times)

npallasi

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We can ask the scuba industry, PADI and other scuba certification agencies to consider a change in their policies. We can commend the dive shops and agencies that do a good job. And we can also learn from our experiences and from each other.

I have been looking through scubaboard.com's Accidents and Incidents forum. They have a place where other divers can share their "Near Misses and Lessons Learned". In this forum, divers can share what went wrong, what they did and what they learned from it. The rules of the forum are that it is a flame-free zone. You can see for yourself what responses there are like: http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/accidents-incidents/ (click on "Near Misses and Lessons Learned").

The main ideas supporting this forum are that each diver is responsible for his or her own safety, and that by sharing openly without fear we can learn from each other's mistakes.  :)

snikrs

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I have been looking through scubaboard.com's Accidents and Incidents forum. They have a place where other divers can share their "Near Misses and Lessons Learned". In this forum, divers can share what went wrong, what they did and what they learned from it. The rules of the forum are that it is a flame-free zone. You can see for yourself what responses there are like: http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/accidents-incidents/ (click on "Near Misses and Lessons Learned").

The main ideas supporting this forum are that each diver is responsible for his or her own safety, and that by sharing openly without fear we can learn from each other's mistakes.  :)

Indeed, I agree with npallasi on this. Having an area where divers are able to share their experiences and allow others to have case studies to learn from will be good.

I feel that most dive agencies in general are not putting enough stress on the risks involved with diving. And even if they do, they only touch the surface without the clear cut seriousness about the issue. It's probably too much to go Army style, with pictures of accidents and such, but it would be great to incorporate real life stories and case studies into theory lessons, even for Open Water Diver courses. It allows the (potential) divers to think through if they have the sufficient skills and confidence to take on the course, or if they require more practice.

Dive centers themselves should allow divers who are not confident of their current skills to change their course/trip package if necessary. For example, a diver with 5 logged dives signed up for an Advanced Open Water course, but upon attending the theory lesson, feels that he/she is not confident for a night and deep dive. The dive center by allowing him/her to switch to a leisure trip - and refund a portion or offer a discount on the next course - will definitely promote a safer thinking attitude with their divers.

On the diver's part, the buddy and divemasters/instructors should be informed if they are using any new equipment. I've seen a few divers purchase new gear from shops, and take the new equipment on dives immediately, and they really mess things up for themselves when they aren't familiar with their configuration. I've seen a scenario, where the diver got so stressed up with not losing his pointer, and clutching to it all through the dive, he didn't even clear his mask and was struggling to see. His buddy was away snapping pictures and the dive guide was at the front of the group.

As much as scuba diving is proclaimed as a buddy sport, being self-sufficient is the way to go. No buddy is able to stick by one's side all the way through and be their "backup". It's always the diver's onus to be responsible for their own safety by having their own backup equipment for redundancy and learning how to use them. It's pretty much like driving - if you have a flat tire, you may have a spare but not know how to change it, you'd still need someone to stop by to help. Maybe you'd figure it out eventually, but the difference is that in diving, every second matters.

Crash

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Indeed, I agree with npallasi on this. Having an area where divers are able to share their experiences and allow others to have case studies to learn from will be good.

I feel that most dive agencies in general are not putting enough stress on the risks involved with diving. And even if they do, they only touch the surface without the clear cut seriousness about the issue. It's probably too much to go Army style, with pictures of accidents and such, but it would be great to incorporate real life stories and case studies into theory lessons, even for Open Water Diver courses. It allows the (potential) divers to think through if they have the sufficient skills and confidence to take on the course, or if they require more practice.

Dive centers themselves should allow divers who are not confident of their current skills to change their course/trip package if necessary. For example, a diver with 5 logged dives signed up for an Advanced Open Water course, but upon attending the theory lesson, feels that he/she is not confident for a night and deep dive. The dive center by allowing him/her to switch to a leisure trip - and refund a portion or offer a discount on the next course - will definitely promote a safer thinking attitude with their divers.

On the diver's part, the buddy and divemasters/instructors should be informed if they are using any new equipment. I've seen a few divers purchase new gear from shops, and take the new equipment on dives immediately, and they really mess things up for themselves when they aren't familiar with their configuration. I've seen a scenario, where the diver got so stressed up with not losing his pointer, and clutching to it all through the dive, he didn't even clear his mask and was struggling to see. His buddy was away snapping pictures and the dive guide was at the front of the group.

As much as scuba diving is proclaimed as a buddy sport, being self-sufficient is the way to go. No buddy is able to stick by one's side all the way through and be their "backup". It's always the diver's onus to be responsible for their own safety by having their own backup equipment for redundancy and learning how to use them. It's pretty much like driving - if you have a flat tire, you may have a spare but not know how to change it, you'd still need someone to stop by to help. Maybe you'd figure it out eventually, but the difference is that in diving, every second matters.


I fully agree on this one. As much as buddy system goes, every diver should be self-sufficient. The best scenario would be to have a buddy beside you helping when you are in trouble. But as we all know that's not always the case. if there is a chance of divers getting separated and left alone, it will definitely happend; its just a matter of when and where. I believe every diver should have the skills, knowledge and equipment to get him or herself out of trouble alone without help from anyone else. Like having personal torch, smb, whistle, cutting devices, etc. so that in the event that shit hits the propeller, one will have a better chance of getting out of trouble. Sadly some divers don't even know the procedure in the event of buddy separation. And many dive centres don't encourage the use or purchase of such safety equipment during ow or aow courses.

Just to share, I got separated from my group last week during a dive trip. Visibility was rather bad and I just happend stopped to take a picture of a coral. One minute my buddy was beside me, after a few clicks of the shutter button, he was gone. I search around but couldn't see anyone. Did I panic? Nope, coz I knew had everything I need with me; two torches, smb and reel, a pair of shears, a whistle and a small mirror. I even have a couple of lightsticks stashed in my pouch. But most importantly, I had the knowledge of what to do when in the event I got separated. After several fail attempts of using my torch to signal and banging my tank to attract attention, I eventually made my safety stop and deployed my smb. I was picked up by the boatman a few minutes after I've surfaced.

Looking back, I can't imagine how I foolish I was to dive countless times before without any of these equipments. Rather than spending on such such safety equipments, I went to purchase underwater camera housing and such. I previously had the impression that I would always have a buddy at my side and I could just rely on his equipments. I was really dumb.

Maybe for a start SUF can propose every diver to possess his own personal safety equipment? I mean it doesn't cost THAT much compared to the cost most divers spend on other equipments and their camera set up. What do you guys think?
« Last Edit: 25 Apr 14, 19:16 by Crash »

dp4610yz

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Maybe someone can put togather a safe diving kit that everyone should have...all in one pouch which can either be slide into d 2in webbing of a weight belt or a backplate or has d ability to unhook via a boltsnap from a d ring :)
PADI - OW
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PADI - Rescue
PADI - DMT

Crash

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Maybe someone can put togather a safe diving kit that everyone should have...all in one pouch which can either be slide into d 2in webbing of a weight belt or a backplate or has d ability to unhook via a boltsnap from a d ring :)

yeah. Dive right in scuba has a safety package named after scubaboard's chairman as seen here:



http://www.diverightinscuba.com/catalog/techequipmentpackages-drisdivegear-netdocsafetypackage-p-3807.html

Maybe we can have our own safety package (named after our local mods DIN/siaokao's safety package  :P) and sell it at cost price or partially subsidise by SUF for new open water divers. Maybe this can help spur and advocate safe diving. We can maybe start promoting it at Adex next year onwards, possibly getting the cost of adex tickets refund for every safety package purchased there(similar to the current promo for new open water sign up at the show). In time, more and more divers will own their own safety equipment and it will definitely create more awareness for the need of such safety equipments to new open water students and those interested in signing up. I'll be more than willing to help out for this cause. I'm sure there's other members here who feel the same way too.


just my 2cents ;)

dp4610yz

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Food for Tot

i have checked out the pricing of all the items to be put together....
without a bag...

Trilobite, all black, {2 in | 5.1 cm} Harness Mount     $24.95   
DGX Custom - Polycarbonate Finger Spool (24m)    $10.95   
DGX Safety Sausage, Orange                             $13.99   
Underwater Wrist Slate, Multi-Page (Black)             $5.75

Total is USD$55.64 (74SGD)

if you wanna do a full package with a good dive accessories pouch pocket type

DR-AC3202   DC Bellows Pocket, Vertical, Velcro Closure   $30.00 (38SGD)   
http://www.divegearexpress.com/bcs/pockets.shtml#1736

The total will be USD$85.64 (114SGD)

Just wonder if anyone will really pay for this as a newbie or just finish OW :)
Regards
Daniel
PADI - OW
SSI - AA aka AOW
PADI - Rescue
PADI - DMT

Crash

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Food for Tot

i have checked out the pricing of all the items to be put together....
without a bag...

Trilobite, all black, {2 in | 5.1 cm} Harness Mount     $24.95   
DGX Custom - Polycarbonate Finger Spool (24m)    $10.95   
DGX Safety Sausage, Orange                             $13.99   
Underwater Wrist Slate, Multi-Page (Black)             $5.75

Total is USD$55.64 (74SGD)

if you wanna do a full package with a good dive accessories pouch pocket type

DR-AC3202   DC Bellows Pocket, Vertical, Velcro Closure   $30.00 (38SGD)   
http://www.divegearexpress.com/bcs/pockets.shtml#1736

The total will be USD$85.64 (114SGD)

Just wonder if anyone will really pay for this as a newbie or just finish OW :)
Regards
Daniel


I guess we must first start promoting it as a necessary gear rather than just an optional accessory. Looking at how newbies and those just finished their OW splurge on new gears and changing them every now and then(me included), I'm sure the price is reasonable for a one time purchase. Besides, the equipment mentioned can be used for many years to come and be used when they further their diving education. And with padi revising their ow course with the addition of Inflatable signal tube use as part of their training, I'm sure the possession of personal safety gear will pick up.


P.S: I think a pair of shears would be a better option in the package as their first cutting tool. Just my two cents  :)

snikrs

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I would think the slate, sausage and spool would make sense. The trilobite seems really expensive for a "starter" kit, and not everyone may prefer that style of cutting tool IMO... Maybe a simple line cutter would suffice. More "friendly" price, and no heart pain if decide to change to another style of cutting tool.  ;D

Crash

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I would think the slate, sausage and spool would make sense. The trilobite seems really expensive for a "starter" kit, and not everyone may prefer that style of cutting tool IMO... Maybe a simple line cutter would suffice. More "friendly" price, and no heart pain if decide to change to another style of cutting tool.  ;D

haha...I think the trauma shears on DGE cost less than SGD9. Very friendly price. :)

snikrs

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haha...I think the trauma shears on DGE cost less than SGD9. Very friendly price. :)

Oh yup! It's really less than $10! That's a good price.

Seems like Dive Rite has their own package too. The Night Diver version even includes a hand-held torch. http://www.divegearexpress.com/tools/daisychain.shtml

Seems like all the options are out there already, just that no one bring in to SG for easy access. Meh.