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Author Topic: Let's all contribute and do something to improve safety standards  (Read 5878 times)

blurblur

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Summary of PADI Courses and Programs



Note: Ratios apply to favorable conditions only. Rough, turbid, very cold water or other circumstances may warrant reduced ratios for student safety. (See Ratios - Student Diver-to-Instructor in this guide.) • 12 students to 1 instructor and 1 mannequin † For any open water or confined open water dive that includes 10-11 year olds, the maximum ratio is 4:1, no more than 2 of the 4 may be age 10 or 11.



Open Water Course Ratio

Confined Water
10:1 May add four student divers per certified assistant.
Open Water
8:1 May add two student divers per certified assistant to a maximum of 12.


Advanced Open Water Course Ratio
General — 8:1 May add four student divers per certified assistant
On deep dives, do not increase this ratio with the use of certified assistants.

May I add that divers should check if the certified assistants are actually 'certified'.

A DMT (divemaster trainee) is NOT a certified assistant.

So lets say there is 1 instructor, 8 students and 1 divemaster trainee, the number of students here is 9 (above ratio) because a non-certified assistant should be counted in your student ratio.
"Diving is perfectly safe as long as you remember how dangerous it is" Mark Powell.

mao

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A little contribution on my part. Mentioned earlier, being self-sufficient is essential. However, to achieve self-sufficiency is an issue of time. The more water time you put in as well as higher learnings, you get better. Questions is, whilst you are working to self-sufficiency, things can happen if you take matters over lightly. Everytime you get into the water, there are inherent risks, whether you are a pro or a beginer.

Emphasis on buddy responsiblity is utmost important. How often to do you start a dive and see other divers dive so far apart from their buddies? My answer to that is "Every single dive I have been on". Buddies have to do more than just thinking "Oh, so and so is my buddy". It also doesn't end with just buddy checks on the surface. You are suppose to watch each other's back for the whole dive and all your dives. That would include from descending togther (looking back at your buddy every couple of metres, if you are in front), waiting if you need to, communicate constantly with each other every single thing you do sub-surface, checking on each other every 5 or 10mins, knowing where each other is every miniute, etc. Everyone of us divers would have experienced a situation where 1 min you see your buddy, you turn your head, the next minute you don't see you buddy anymore. We are all just fortunate nothing happened on those occasions.

If you stop for pictures, your buddy better wait for you, like it or not. If he wants to see something 10 ft away he signals his intention to you first before he moves. You should be in close proximity with each other at all times.

Most divers play down these scenarios and shrug it off and would respond "Ok one la" or "I can still see him/her in the distance" etc. Well, try having your air run out or burst a HP hose and then have to swim 10 ft to your buddy to grab his octo. I can tell you it is not as easy as you imagine! 10 ft is not very far away. Throw in the site conditions and it is a different ball game.

With all the marketing and hype from peers that diving is fun and all, does cloak the evident responsibility as a diver to be safe for diving to be fun. Divers are often excited that they are going diving etc etc. that they forget that to enjoy diving you need to be safe and to be safe you need to remember your responsiblities as a buddy to another diver.

Dive centre have to drill this mindset into divers from the very first day. Even though self-sufficiency is what you need to be, the buddy system is actually a very effective system if you practise it seriously.

When in a situations, 2 divers do have a tendency to calm each other down as well. Perhaps my input will motivate all divers to reassess if they should step up what they have been doing as a dive buddy.

Last but not least, if you are new diver after OW, on your next leisure dive, please do not think that you are a certified diver and you can start looking around for marine life and stuff; like a season diver. Spend those dives practising your buoyancy, finning techniques (which is very important! No bicycle kicking!) etc. You have plenty of time enjoying the marine world when you have more experience under you belt (in time).

Just my humble opinion if it helps anyone..:)
« Last Edit: 26 Apr 14, 02:37 by mao »

hellhole

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imo... education is more important..

educate the would be divers what they are getting themselves into....  what they have to look out for and that they are assured and what they should get out of it.... if its really not for them.. step away.

maybe ADEX theme next year should be 'humans'

mel

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May I add that divers should check if the certified assistants are actually 'certified'.

A DMT (divemaster trainee) is NOT a certified assistant.

So lets say there is 1 instructor, 8 students and 1 divemaster trainee, the number of students here is 9 (above ratio) because a non-certified assistant should be counted in your student ratio.

i don't think the DMT should be counted as a student as the lesson is a OW lesson.

the DMT is already a cetified diver.

orpheusdive

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i don't think the DMT should be counted as a student as the lesson is a OW lesson.

the DMT is already a cetified diver.

Mel, as a DMT is a divemaster trainee in training, he is considered a "certified" diver but the fact is that he is on course and is under the supervision of an instructor, he is taken into ratio consideration.

trekdive

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Maybe someone can put togather a safe diving kit that everyone should have...all in one pouch which can either be slide into d 2in webbing of a weight belt or a backplate or has d ability to unhook via a boltsnap from a d ring :)

Yes, I second the SMB as a need. While I was in an Aussie university diving club, all rental BCD in the club are equip with SMB and whistle. Even OW diver can be brief on inflating the SMB on the surface -- You don't want to be in situation where on the surface you signal to the boat but boatman cannot see you(near evening/ far distance) and got drift away....

orpheusdive

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It is good to see that some concern divers are making a point to contribute to the safety aspect of the local diving community.

But just to clarify certain concerns brought up in this thread, on behalf of PADI, we would like to take the chance to clarify some misunderstanding and confusions of terms that are being used. Even some senior and experience instructors will not be able to know the difference properly.

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The Sphere of Learning
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In PADI system, we employ the sphere of learning. I will not go in depth what The Sphere of Learning is but I will cover what is the concern of the divers of this board.

In the first inner circle, we call them self learning. This is know as the basic course, Open Water as most of you know it by. Regardless of agency, divers SHOULD learn the fundamentals of diving, concepts, safety, proper use of equipment, environment and some physics concepts of diving.

In the next sphere, it is task-oriented. This is where divers are task to do certain things under the supervision of an instructor.

Many divers are confused with the term Advanced Diver Course. In PADI system, we DO NOT HAVE the Advanced Diver Course as many of you call it by.

The first full-fledged tier is call the PADI Open Water Diver Course followed by either Adventure Diver (which is not common in Singapore) or the PADI ADVANCED Open Water Diver course. As the name implies, it is an Advanced Open Water Diver course and NOT AN ADVANCED Diver course.

The difference? As an Advance Diver (in accordance to some agencies), you will need minimum dives, certain experience and more skills being learned. A misconception by most people, as an "Advanced Diver", it is more or less of equivalence to PADI Master Scuba Diver. You will need to have Rescue Diver, and a minimum of 5 Specialties. Which means that divers will have no less than 20 dives under their belt.

The PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course as mentioned, is a task oriented course. It is meant to be easy and allow divers to experience new form of diving experience under the supervision of a PADI Instructor.

For instant, diver A after completing his PADI Open Water Divers, will love to explore night diving. But he is not willing to commit himself to a full blown specialty course. So he can opt to complete the Adventures in Night Diving. Should he fall in love with it, you can then complete the remaining dives to earn his Specialty in Night Diving. Adventure Dives are known as the "tip of the ice-berg" and it allows diver to taste the specialty before completing it.

Having said that, if a diver A have tasted five different adventures, which includes Deep and Navigation, that earns him the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver certification.

It is not TRUE entirely to see a PADI Advanced Open Water Diver is not train well. The fact is, that they are train only the basics of that particular specialty.

Sad truth is, most PADI Instructors are not fully aware of the PADI System of Learning and a full understanding of The Sphere of Learning. Hence when they promote diving, Basic -> Adv Diver.

And most divers stop at the "Adv Diver" thinking that there are Advanced Divers. This is ENTIRELY not true. They are just Advanced Open Water or slightly more Advance than Open Water Diver :)

I hope this little write up will educate more divers about the difference in PADI Continuation Education program.

If you have any other questions, do feel free to contact me here and I will be glad to answer them

orpheusdive

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Summary of PADI Courses and Programs



Note: Ratios apply to favorable conditions only. Rough, turbid, very cold water or other circumstances may warrant reduced ratios for student safety. (See Ratios - Student Diver-to-Instructor in this guide.) • 12 students to 1 instructor and 1 mannequin † For any open water or confined open water dive that includes 10-11 year olds, the maximum ratio is 4:1, no more than 2 of the 4 may be age 10 or 11.



Open Water Course Ratio

Confined Water
10:1 May add four student divers per certified assistant.
Open Water
8:1 May add two student divers per certified assistant to a maximum of 12.


Advanced Open Water Course Ratio
General — 8:1 May add four student divers per certified assistant
On deep dives, do not increase this ratio with the use of certified assistants.

There is a very important part of information that is not published here.

This are the MAXIMUM ratios but the final ratio is at the discretion of a prudent renewed certified instructor.

For instant, if conducting the same course at Hantu, with visibility of 1 metres, a Prudent instructor should reduce the ratio or use more certified assistants to assist in the course.

Most diving agencies take the cue of minimum standards from WRSTC and each agency will then improve their courses based on the minimum standards recommended.

For those who are keen to read more, please visit http://www.wrstc.com/downloads/03%20-%20Open%20Water%20Diver.pdf

orpheusdive

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Equipment Needed As Posted by Forumer
==================================
Standard Diver Equipment
Make sure divers have, at a minimum:
1.   Fins, mask and snorkel
This equipment should be something all divers should have. Most schools as I love to believe with provide Fins and Mask, sometimes, a snorkel

2.   Compressed gas cylinder and valve*
This is definitely provided :)

3.   Buoyancy control device (BCD) with tank mount or 
separate backpack, and low pressure inflator*
This is definitely provided :)

4.   Primary regulator and alternate air source
This is definitely provided :) The schools however should not recommend the use of Air 2 or similar items at basic level.

5.   Breathing gas monitoring device (e.g. submersible pressure gauge)
This is definitely provided :)

6.   Depth monitoring device
After June, most PADI Dive schools will have to keep a new inventory of dive computers. All students ON COURSES MUST POSSESS THEIR OWN DIVE COMPUTER during the course.

7.   Quick release weight system and weights (if necessary for neutral buoyancy, or if required for skills practice)
This is definitely provided :) PADI has made an amendment to the skill weights removal. In June 2014, students will be taught the proper technique of ditching their weights in water in case of any emergencies.

8.   Adequate exposure protection appropriate for local dive conditions. 
Note: The dry suit orientation requirement in this guide.
This is very subjective:) PADI use the word exposure suit and NOT wetsuit because it really depends where you are diving. Some schools provide full suit and some schools provide short suits.

9. At least one audible emergency surface signaling device (whistle, air horn, etc.).
A whistle SHOULD be on all training and rental BCD and this should be PROVIDED by the dive centre.

10. Dive computer or RDP (eRDPML or Table) Familiarize divers with the equipment they use in the course.
After June 2014, all new divers on course will have their own personal RDP and the use of a dive computer. Please NOTE THAT A DIVE COMPUTER CANNOT BE SHARED.

9.   Time monitoring device
Most dive computers has this function so after June 2014, this is included.

10.   Compass
For some schools who are already using the new PADI course syllabus, have already included a small compass attached to their rental dive computers.

11.   Knife/diver’s tool 
Exception: Where prohibited locally.
This is something that divers should carry their own. Schools are too busy with their own maintenance and if this is included as a standard package, chances are when you really want to use it, the knife or dive tool will be too rusty to use :)

12.   Two surface signaling devices – one audible (whistle, air horn, etc.) and one visible (inflatable surface tube, flare, signal mirror, etc.).
Usage of SMB is compulsory in Open Water Diver course, Open Water Dive 1. Some PADI schools have included this as a standard issue in all their rental gears.

I hope we have clarify most of the points. On a side note, each divers should also be encourage to carry their own first aid kit as well.

orpheusdive

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Nautilus Lifeline
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Some schools have taken further measure. Divers have the option to rent Nautilus Lifeline and for our in-house instructors, everyone is equipped with a Nautilus Lifelife in case they are conducting courses and get drifted away from the line of sight of the boat. With a Nautilus Lifeline, they can now radio the boat to inform the boat that they are on the other side of the island.

Most people would take this as a marketing posting. But I will urge each of you to seriously consider this. If you are diving in the open sea and got drifted 1km away the boat, chances of a boat searching for a orange or yellow SMB is not easy. Your air-horn and whistle will not work either as the Captain is searching for you on a moving boat WITH THE NOISE OF ENGINE.

It is relatively inexpensive to invest in a Nautilus Lifeline. It is about the price of your travel insurance for one year.